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Blackface Minstrelsy Books LLC

Blackface Minstrelsy

Books LLC

Published July 5th 2011
ISBN : 9781156404973
Paperback
86 pages
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 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 27. Chapters: Blackface, Minstrel show, Bamboozled, Stump speech, Ordway Hall, The Playhouse, Mammy, Tuxedo,MorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 27. Chapters: Blackface, Minstrel show, Bamboozled, Stump speech, Ordway Hall, The Playhouse, Mammy, Tuxedo, Walkaround, Whiteface, Old Corn Meal, Interlocutor. Excerpt: Blackface is a form of theatrical makeup used in minstrel shows, and later vaudeville, in which performers create a stereotyped caricature of a black person. The practice gained popularity during the 19th century and propagated American racist stereotypes such as the happy-go-lucky darky on the plantation or the dandified coon . In 1848, blackface minstrel shows were the national art of the time, translating formal art such as opera into popular terms for a general audience. Early in the 20th century, blackface branched off from the minstrel show and became a form in its own right, until it ended in the United States with the U.S. Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. Blackface was an important performance tradition in the American theater for roughly 100 years beginning around 1830. It quickly became popular overseas, particularly so in Britain, where the tradition lasted longer than in the US, occurring on primetime TV as late as 1978 (The Black and White Minstrel Show) and 1981. In both the United States and Britain, blackface was most commonly used in the minstrel performance tradition, but it predates that tradition, and it survived long past the heyday of the minstrel show. White blackface performers in the past used burnt cork and later greasepaint or shoe polish to blacken their skin and exaggerate their lips, often wearing woolly wigs, gloves, tailcoats, or ragged clothes to complete the transformation. Later, black artists also performed in blackface. Stereotypes embodied in the stock characters of blackface minstrels not only played a significant role in cementing and proliferating racist images, attitudes and perceptions worldwide, but also in popul...